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wrench
Posts:210
Preferred member
Member since: 2007-01-15
:: Quote ::
Subject: What is considered "Fresh" Content
What Do the search engines consider "Fresh" Content?

Is it because the date on the page changed, or is it "Fresh" because the content within the page changed?

The reason I ask, is I have created many new sites and pages recently that will be updated almost every visit by a robot, or surfer. The page dates will not change very often, because of the method of generation of parts of the content of each page, it will change the content of each page, but not the date.

What is Fresh, and what is rewarded?

GB, you suggested this thread, with a different question
Quote:
What about evergreen content that don't get updated for ages, how come they still get good traffic
.
Wrench
February 11, 2008 06:44PM
Quadrille
Posts:118
Full member
Member since: 2007-09-03
:: Quote ::
Subject: Re: What is considered "Fresh" Content
There's nothing wrong with sites that don't change - provided they have good content. They will still get spidered, and if their number of links grows (which it will, if it's a good site), then they can still advance, albeit slowly and steadily.

Fresh content on a reasonably regular basis, will tend to encourage more frequent and regualr spidereing, but will not in itself ensure progression - that depends on the Quality of the content, and the uniquity and originality of the content relative to whatever else the spiders find. In general, adding fresh content is a 'good' thing to do, and if done as above, will help in many ways, including attracting more links, and offering a wider range of search results to potential visitors.
February 11, 2008 06:53PM
GegaBit
Posts:3311
Senior member
Member since: 2006-11-30
:: Quote ::
Subject: Re: What is considered "Fresh" Content
What Quadrille said :-)
+ Type of content (which we now know Google algo is able to classify)

A news site is expected to have new content by the hour or at least daily. A history site is not expected to change at all.

A widgets stories or forum site is expected to grow in number of pages a sign of popularity, but not change much inside each page. Vs. A widgets industry definitions site is expected to change much less frequently.

Wish I was more interested in history!
February 11, 2008 07:18PM
DamonHD
Posts:6158
Moderator
Member since: 2006-11-30
:: Quote ::
Subject: Re: What is considered "Fresh" Content
Q, interesting stuff...

What about little tweaks here and there: updating a factoid, fixing a typo, etc?

Do you think that SEs notice at all / see this as freshness and/or TLC / see this as attempting to 'game' them / none of the above?

Rgds

Damon
February 11, 2008 07:22PM
Harold
Posts:2494
Senior member
Member since: 2006-11-30
:: Quote ::
Subject: Re: What is considered "Fresh" Content
In my experience, based on what I've noticed on pages that have been indexed for around ten years or so, Google (can't say about others) only notices changes of consequence--changes to the text that actually change the way the page would get indexed.

It doesn't see the page as a new page just because I add a few words somewhere. If I revise the title and the opening paragraph, however, that can have an effect, because it affects how the page is indexed.
February 11, 2008 07:50PM
Pengi
Posts:3345
Senior member
Member since: 2006-12-17
:: Quote ::
Subject: Re: What is considered "Fresh" Content
I would be surprised if Google, or any good search engine, were to treat minor editorial changes or date updates as "fresh content".

I would also be surprised if Google, or any good search engine, were to mark a site/page down just because it has no "fresh content" - but maybe it is a factor for some types of page/site.

My golden rule of thumb is to think in terms of what will work best for the surfer - that will tend to work well with the search engines that matter. Content needs to be good quality and current. If the content has become out of date, its quality will be getting worse. However, if good quality material is still current, it doesn't matter how long it has been since it last changed.
February 11, 2008 08:41PM
Harold
Posts:2494
Senior member
Member since: 2006-11-30
:: Quote ::
Subject: Re: What is considered "Fresh" Content
Pengi,

I think that's a good point, though it seems to me that Google does not have any way of assessing if a given piece of information has become out of date. I've seen pages with out-of-date information--pages that haven't been updated in several years--rank well in searches, simply because the site they are on ranks well.

Example: a page with information about publishers, which gives addresses and editors' names that were accurate five years ago but are not any longer.
February 11, 2008 09:00PM
Quadrille
Posts:118
Full member
Member since: 2007-09-03
:: Quote ::
Subject: Re: What is considered "Fresh" Content
there's two kinds of change that matter: changes in the serps, and changes in spidering frequency.

Depending on your current spidering frequency, any change will be noticed ... but only significant changes will actually affect the serps.

These may be small, depending on keywords involved and niche competition.

I doubt 'insignificant' changes would affect spidering frequency, either, so change for the sake of change is (probably) futile.

I reckon that effort invested in change - unless it's useful to you or your visitors - would be better invested in adding new (extra) content, preferably on new pages.
February 11, 2008 11:12PM
DamonHD
Posts:6158
Moderator
Member since: 2006-11-30
:: Quote ::
Subject: Re: What is considered "Fresh" Content
The sort of changes I'm talking about are for the good of the visitor by keeping existing text readable, accurate and up-to-date.

Not change for change's sake.

So, no, I wouldn't expect miracles, but it's potetially an interesting middle ground between 'stale' and 'fresh' IMHO.

Rgds

Damon
February 12, 2008 12:40AM
Quadrille
Posts:118
Full member
Member since: 2007-09-03
:: Quote ::
Subject: Re: What is considered "Fresh" Content
The kind of changes you describe are important - and I'd not suggest not doing them.

But there's no reason why such changes should affect SE placement, except perhaps in one or two really esoteric searches ... every bit helps, of course, and housekeeping can make a difference in other ways:

As you tidy, you can check that H tags, use of b/strong etc., are appropriate. As you tidy the text, you'll be correcting out-dated terms as you go along ... making searches on more current terms that little bit more likely to happen.

But SEs work by matching search terms with what's there on the page, so if the content is substantially the same, the serps will be too!
February 12, 2008 01:45AM
Pengi
Posts:3345
Senior member
Member since: 2006-12-17
:: Quote ::
Subject: Re: What is considered "Fresh" Content
I agree that Google would find it difficult, if not impossible, to recognise when content has become out of date.

However, I believe that what matters to Google is what matters to surfers and the WWW as a whole - if a site or page is picking up fresh links and visits then Google may consider the site itself remains fresh.
February 12, 2008 08:50AM

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